Signature and Certificate based key injection for ATM


Overview

Remote key loading infrastructures generally implement Diebold’s and Triton’s Certificate Based Protocols (CBP), and NCR, Wincor and Hyosung Signature based Protocols.

The Diebold and Triton approaches use X.509 certificates and PKCS message formats to transport key data. NCR, Wincor and Hyosung methods rely on digital signatures to ensure data integrity. Both processes require the loading of the ATM EPP with a public key or certificate at the factory. Both these methods are supported in and XFS compliant manner and this document describes the process of doing so as well as the pitfalls and benefits of using both methods.

The General Process

Initialization

A prerequisite for using Remote Keys is for a customer to generate a set of keys or certificates that will be “signed” by a Certificate Authority or Trust Authority. Once signed, the public key or certificate signatures are returned and imported into the Host system. The EPPs obtain their signed public keys or certificates during the manufacturing process before being installed in ATMs.

Mutual Authentication

With public and private key pairs now present in the Host and in the ATM’s EPP, mutual authentication can be initiated with message exchanges from the Host to the EPP.  The ATM sends the EPP serial number to Host encrypted by its public key or certificate. The Host verifies the message and sends a message back to the EPP encrypted by its public key or certificate.

Key Delivery

With mutual authentication successfully completed, the Host receives a request to deliver a new terminal master key to the EPP. The Host receives the key request and generates a random terminal master key and encrypts it with the public key of the EPP and “signs” the new TMK message. This message is sent to the EPP. The EPP verifies the signature, decrypts the new terminal master key, and stores the key.

If the dialogue has been successfully completed, the EPP sends a notification back to the Host that it has loaded the new terminal master key including a Key Check Value (KCV) of the new key. If the terminal key load is unsuccessful, an appropriate error message will be returned to the Host. Upon receiving a “successful” terminal master key load message from the EPP with the correct KCV, the Host will establish the new TMK in the key database.

 

 

Remote Key Loading Using Signatures

RSA Data Authentication and Digital Signatures

Digital signatures rely on a public key infrastructure (PKI). The PKI model involves an entity, such as a Host, having a pair of encryption keys – one private, one public. These keys work in consort to encrypt, decrypt and authenticate data.

One-way authentication occurs is through the application of a digital signature. For example:

  1. The Host creates some data that it would like to digitally sign;
  2. Host runs the data through a hashing algorithm to produce a hash or digest of the data. The digest is unique to every block of data – a digital fingerprint of the data, much smaller and therefore more economical to encrypt than the data itself.
  3. Digest is encrypted with the Host’s private key. This is the digital signature – a data block digest encrypted with the private key.

The Host then sends the following to the ATM:

  1. Data block.
  2. Digital signature.
  3. Host’s public key.

To validate the signature, the ATM performs the following:

ATM runs data through the standard hashing algorithm – the same one used by the Host – to produce a digest of the data received. Consider this digest2;

ATM uses the Host’s public key to decrypt the digital signature. The digital signature was produced using the Host’s private key to encrypt the data digest; therefore, when decrypted with the Host’s public key it produces the same digest. Consider this digest1. Incidentally, no other public key in the world would work to decrypt digest1 – only the public key corresponding to the signing private key.

ATM compares digest1 with digest2. If digest1 matches digest2 exactly, the ATM has confirmed that the data was not tampered with in transit. Changing a single bit in the data sent from the Host to the ATM would cause digest2 to be different than digest1. Every data block has a unique digest; therefore, an altered data block is detected by the ATM.

Public key used to decrypt the digital signature corresponds to the private key used to create it. No other public key could possibly work to decrypt the digital signature, so the ATM was not handed someone else’s public key.

This gives an overview of how Digital Signatures can be used in Data Authentication. In particular, Signatures can be used to validate and securely install Encryption Keys.

The following section describes Key Exchange and the use of Digital signatures.

 

RSA Secure Key Exchange using Digital Signatures

In summary, both end points, the ATM and the Host, inform each other of their Public Keys. This information is then used to securely send the PIN device Master Key to the ATM.

A trusted third party, the Signature Issuer, is used to generate the signatures for the Public keys of each end point, ensuring their validity.

The detail of this is as follows:

Purpose:

The Host wishes to install a new master key (KM) on the ATM securely.

Assumptions:

  • The Host has obtained the Public Key (PKSI) from the Signature Issuer.
  • The Host has provided the Signature Issuer with its Public Key (PKHOST), and receives the corresponding signature Sign(SKSI)[ PKHOST]. The Signature Issuer uses its own Private Key (SKSI) to create this signature.
  • In the case where Enhanced Remote Key Loading is used, the Host has provided the Signature Issuer with its Public Key (PKROOT), and receives the corresponding signature Sign(SKSI)[PKROOT]. The Host has generated another key pair PKHOST and SKHOST and signs the PKHOST with the SKROOT.
  • (Optional) The Host obtains a list of the valid PIN device’s Unique Identifiers. The Signature Issuer installs a Signature Sign(SKSI)[ UIATM] for the Unique Id (UIATM) on the ATM PIN. The Signature Issuer uses SKSI to do this.
  • The Signature Issuer installs its Public Key (PKSI) on the ATM PIN. It also derives and installs the Signature Sign(SKSI )[PKATM] of the ATM PIN’s Public Key (PKATM) on the ATM PIN. The Signature Issuer uses SKSI to do this.
  • The ATM PIN device additionally contains its own Public (PKATM) and Private Key (SKATM).

Steps for the Process

 

Step 1: The ATM PIN sends its Public Key to the Host in a secure structure: The ATM PIN sends its ATM Public Key with its associated Signature. When the Host receives this information it will use the Signature Issuer’s Public Key to validate the signature and obtain the ATM Public Key.

Step 2 (Optional):  The Host verifies that the key it has just received is from a valid sender. It does this by obtaining the PIN device unique identifier. The ATM PIN sends its Unique Identifier with its associated Signature. When the Host receives this information it will use the Signature Issuer’s Public Key to validate the signature and retrieve the PIN Unique Identifier. It can then check this against the list it received from the Signature Issuer.

Step 3 (Enhanced Remote Key Loading only) : The Host sends its root public key to the ATM PIN: The Host sends its Root Public Key (PKROOT) and associated Signature. The ATM PIN verifies the signature using PKSI and stores the key.

Step 4:  The Host sends its public key to the ATM PIN: The Host sends its Public Key (PKHOST) and associated Signature. The ATM PIN verifies the signature using PKSI (or PKROOT in the Enhanced Remote Key Loading Scheme) and stores the key

Step 5:  The ATM PIN receives its Master Key from the Host: The Host encrypts the Master Key (KM) with PKATM. A signature for this is then created. The ATM PIN will then validate the signature using PKHOST and then obtain the master key by decrypting using SKATM.

 Step 6 – Alternative including random number:  The Host requests the ATM PIN to begin the DES key transfer process and generate a random number. The Host encrypts the Master Key (KM) with PKATM. A signature for the random number and encrypted key is then created using SKHOST. The ATM PIN will then validate the signature using PKHOST, verify the random number and then obtain the master key by decrypting using SKATM.

 

Remote Key Loading Using Certificates

Certificate Exchange and Authentication

Both end points, the ATM and the Host, inform each other of their Public Keys. This information is then used to securely send the PIN device Master Key to the ATM. A trusted third party, Certificate Authority (or a HOST if it becomes the new CA), is used to generate the certificates for the Public Keys of each end point, ensuring their validity. In this message contains the Host certificate, which has been signed by the trusted CA. The Pinpad Cryptography Unit (CTU) uses the Public Key of the CA (loaded at the time of production) to verify the validity of the certificate. If the certificate is valid, the CTU stores the HOST’s Public Verification Key. The CTU then sends a message that contains a certificate, which is signed by the CA and is sent to the HOST. The HOST uses the Public Key from the CA to verify the certificate. If valid then the HOST stores the CTU’s verification or encryption key (primary or secondary this depends on the state of the CTU).

 

 

Remote Key Exchange

After the above has been completed, the HOST is ready to load the key into the CTU.

The following is done to complete this and the application must complete the Remote Key Exchange in this order:

  1. Return RATM from the CTU to be used in authenticating the message.
  2. Next, the ATM sends down the KTK to the CTU. The following items below show how this is accomplished.
  3. a) HOST has obtained a Key Transport Key and wants to transfer it to the CTU. HOST constructs a key block containing an identifier of the HOST, IHOST, and the key, KKTK, and enciphers the block, using the CTU’s Public Encryption Key.
  4. b) After completing the above, the HOST generates random data and builds the outer message containing the random number of the Host, RHOST, and the random number of the ATM, RATM. The identifier of the CTU, IENC, and the enciphered key block. The HOST signs the whole block using its private signature key and sends the message down to the CTU. The CTU then verifies the HOST’s signature on the message by using the HOST’s Public Verification Key. Then the CTU checks the identifier and the random number of the CTU passed in the message to make sure that the CTU is talking to the right HOST. The CTU then deciphers the enciphered block using its private verification key. After the message has been deciphered, the CTU checks the Identifier of the HOST. Finally, if everything checks out to this point the CTU will load the Key Transport Key
  5. c) After the Key Transport Key has been accepted, the CTU constructs a message that contains the random number of the Host, the random number of the CTU and the HOST identifier all signed by the private signature key of the CTU. This message is sent to the Host.
  6. d) The HOST verifies the message sent from the CTU by using the ATM’s public verification key. The HOST then checks the identifier of the Host and then compares the identifier in the message with the one stored in the HOST. Then checks the random number sent in the message and to the one stored in the HOST. The HOST finally checks the CTU’s random number with the one received.

 

Replace Certificate

After the key is been loaded into the CTU, the following could be completed: The new CA requests a Certificate from the previous Certificate Authority. The HOST must over-sign the message to take over the role of the CA to ensure that the CTU accepts the new Certificate Authority. The HOST sends the message to the CTU. The CTU uses the HOST’s Public Verification Key to verify the HOST’s signature. The CTU uses the previous CA’s Public Verification Key to verify the signature on the new Certificate sent down in the message. If valid, the EPP stores the new CA’s certificate and uses the new CA’s Public Verification Key as its new CA verification key.

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